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Namibia Wildlife Resorts Board of Directors 2016 - 2019

Board Members

Front Row (L-R): Ms. Janet Wilson-Moore (Deputy Chairperson), Ambassador Leonard Iipumbu (Chairperson), Ms. Eva Shifotoka, and Ms. Zelna Hengari (Managing Director).

Back Row (L-R): Ms. Carol Williams, Mr. Rudie Putter, Ms. Elize Petersen, Mr. Bernd Schneider.

 

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Etosha

One of the largest savannah conservation areas in Africa, Etosha National Park is world reknown for its spectacular wildlife: elephant, black and white rhinoceros, lions, leopards, cheetahs, large herds of springbok, zebra, wildebeest, giraffe and a multitude of other fascinating species, big and small, interacting in their natural environment.

Namibia Wildlife Resorts is exclusively located within the Etosha National Park. The three camps; Okaukuejo, Halali and Namutoni have underwent major renovations throughout 2007. These upgrades and the launch of a fourth, exclusive facility, Onkoshi Camp provides NWR's clientele with a wider range of comfort and a wildlife experience of a lifetime.

NWR - Exclusive Night Drives and Guided Day Drives

Namibia Wildlife Resorts is now offering, for the first time in the 100 year history of the park, guided night drives from the three resorts in Etosha, providing visitors with an opportunity to experience an entirely different side of Etosha's wildlife treasures. Morning and afternoon guided drives are also on offer.

All guided drives are conducted in specially modified land-rovers, using experienced guides who will help you discover the wonders of nature, both big and small.

 

Waterberg

Waterberg Plateau Park is a national park in central Namibia encompassing the Waterberg Plateau, 68 km east of the town of Otjiwarongo. The Waterberg Plateau is a particularly prominent feature, elevated high above the plains of the Kalahari of Eastern Namibia. The plateau and some 405 km² of surrounding land were declared a Nature Reserve in 1972. The plateau is largely inaccessible so in the early 1970s several of Namibia's endangered species were translocated there to protect them from predators and poaching to extinction. The programme was very successful and Waterberg now supplies other Namibian parks with rare species. In 1989, Black Rhino were reintroduced to the area from Damaraland, sparking a successful breeding programme of national and international significance for the species.

The Waterberg Plateau Park is ecologically diverse and rich and has over 200 different species of bird and some rare species of small antelope on the lower hills of the mountain.

Geologically, the oldest rock stratum is over 850 million years old and dinosaurs tracks were left there some 200 million years ago. The first human inhabitants were the San people, who left rock engravings believed to be several thousand years old. A small tribe of the San were still living their traditional lifestyle on the plateau until the late 1960s.

The site is also home to one of the major turning points in Namibia's History. It was at Waterberg, in the foothills, that the Herero people lost their last and greatest battle against German colonial forces at the beginning of the 20th century. The Herero were forced to retreat from the Waterberg and headed eastward to British Bechuanaland (now Botswana). Thousands were killed by the pursuing Germans and many lost their lives in the Kalahari Desert due to lack of food and water. Estimates are that nearly two thirds of the Herero population lost their lives during this period. The graves of German soldiers who lost their lives at Waterberg can still be viewed near the waterberg rest camp at the base of the park.

 

Skeleton

The Skeleton Coast Park was proclaimed in its present form in 1973, and extends from the Ugab River in the south 500 km to the Kunene River in the north. The attraction of this remote area lies essentially in the color, changing moods and untouched profile of its landscape. Its aura of mystery and impenetrability is due to the many shipwrecks, dense coastal fogs and cold sea breeze caused by the cold Benguela Current.

The landscape in the park ranges from sweeping vistas of windswept dunes to rugged canyons with walls of richly colored volcanic rock and extensive mountain ranges. On their slopes grow a surprising variety of interesting xerophytic plants, whose survival is ensured by a wide spectrum of ingenious adaptations. A conspicuous example is the curious elephant's foot, Adenia pechuelii, which anchors itself in rock crevices.

Over a hundred species of lichen grow on the plains and west-facing mountain slopes, which change color and become soft and leathery to the touch when the coastal fog pushes inland.

 

Naukluft

Sandwiched between two deserts - the Namib in the west and the Kalahari in the east - Namibia's arid southern region offers breathtaking landscapes.

The Namib-Naukluft Park is Namibia's most versatile conservation area and one of the country's major tourist destinations. The vast wilderness of almost 50 000 square km contains key features such as Sossusvlei, Sesriem, the Welwitschia Trail, Sandwich Harbour, the Naukluft Mountains and the Kuiseb Canyon. This vast tract of land covering an area the size of Germany, consists of dunes (some of which at Sossusvlei are amongst the highest in the world), gravel plains and rugged mountainous areas.

It is one of the least populated areas in the country where the visitor can experience an intense feeling of vastness and isolation. Here the magical and awe-inspiring beauty of the night skies can be enjoyed like few places on earth.

Sossusvlei, with its monumental dunes, up to 325 m when measured from the base, is one of the top destinations in Namibia. The star-shaped dunes are a sought after topic for artists and photographers. Formed by strong multi-directional winds,they are at their highest and most spectacular where the west-flowing Tsauchab River empties itself into the vlei. The warm tints of the sand, ranging from apricot to orange, red and maroon, contrast vividly with the dazzling white surfaces of the large deflationary clay pans at their bases. One of these, referred to as Dead Pan, is a large ghostly expanse of dried white clay, punctuated by skeletons of ancient camel-thorn trees, carbon-dated as being between 500 and 600 years old. When it has rained sufficiently in the interior for the Tsauchab River to come down and fill the main pan, flamingoes and other aquatic birds are drawn to the area.

The Naukluft section completes the other half of the Namib - Naukluft National Park. Encompassing the Naukluft mountains and boasting massive and varied rock formations, Naukluft is a geologist's paradise. The intermittent layers of horizontally folded igneous rock, quartzite, dolomite and shale are impressive with their giant symmetrical patterns. Five different vegetation communities within the park ensure a wealth of tree and shrub species, and a variety of aloes.

In addition to the Hartmann's mountain zebra, there are kudu, gemsbok, klipspringer, duiker, steenbok, leopard, baboon, black-backed jackal, bat-eared fox, African wild cat, caracal and aardwolf. Naukluft's steep cliffs are nesting grounds for various cliff-breeding bird species, including Black eagles.

 

/Ai-/Ais

The Fish River Canyon is the largest canyon in the world after the famous grand canyon. In places this canyon is 550 m deep and overall it is some 160 km long. It is one of the main tourist attractions in the south of the country. The /Ai-/Ais Park now forms part of the /Ai-/Ais / Richtersveld transfrontier park, and visitors will soon be able to cross from South Africa to Namibia using the Sendelingsdrift border post within the park.

Distances between towns and resorts in this area are long, and tourists should be well prepared to enjoy the scenery when travelling in this region.


Welcome to the NWR Travel Trade Resource Center

Welcome! NWR is committed to supporting the travel trade in their marketing, promotion and selling of NWR products. To assist you, we have developed several sales tools:

NWR Specialist Program

This educational course is designed to help give you a deep understanding of NWR’s product portfolio and itineraries so that you can easily sell them to your clients. Click here to register.

If you have already created an account, you may login on the righthand side of this screen and begin the course here.

Image Gallery

Our image gallery is hosted on Flickr. If you need access to a photo for marketing purposes please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."> email us and we will send you a high-res version within 24 hours: https://www.flickr.com/photos/123982147@N07/

Marketing Copy Gallery

Our copy gallery is comprised of word documents with short and long description of all our properties, which you can use in your marketing materials. To access marketing materials, click here.

Content Kits

We create high-quality content for you to share on your social media networks. In the monthly content kits you will find blog posts, newsletter stories, Facebook posts and tweets all ready to be posted on your networks! You are welcome to edit them or use them as is. To access content kits, click here.

Quarterly Newsletters

We send out quarterly newsletters with the latest NWR news and promotions. To register, please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">email us.

Fam Trip Registration

If you would like to register for a FAM trip, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."> This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We run about 3 FAM trips a year, and select participants based on their potential to sell NWR products.

Any questions? Your trade liaisons are here to help. Contact us at any time at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."> This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Hosting you in Namibia's pristine protected areas

Namibia Wildlife Resorts is a State owned enterprise, mandated to run the tourism facilities within the protected areas of Namibia. Its only shareholder is the Government of the Republic of Namibia; hence, it belongs to the Namibian people. The company was created through an Act of Parliament, the Namibia Wildlife Resorts Company Act, and has been in existence since 1998.


Vision

NWR is a recognised leader in tourism and hospitality services in Namibia


Values

Accountability

We are responsible and answerable to stakeholders for decisions and actions.

Integrity

We walk our talk; our personal and professional conduct is consistent with the common public good, we are trustworthy.

Passion

We employ people with a zest for life and work; who are fully engaged with work and life.

Respect

We respect our clients, colleagues and all stakeholders.


With regards to lodging, NWR offers three different collections within Namibia’s protected areas;

1. Eco Collection Enjoy an intimate getaway within our National Parks in our environmentally friendly establishments;
2. Classic Collection Experience a wide variety of accommodation options within our National Parks and urban areas; and
3. Adventure Collection If you are a budget conscious traveller, you will certainly find an option that suits you.

NWR provides intimate park experiences through guided night drives in Etosha National Park; sunrise and sunset excursions to the majestic Sossusvlei; relaxing massages and wellness treatments using the healing properties of the natural hot springs mineral water at /Ai-/Ais – all in the company of the most passionate and professional staff.

The company also offers real adventure activities such as hikes into Namibia's iconic landscapes on signature trails such as the Fish River Canyon - the world's second largest canyon (four to five days and approximately 50 miles) and the Namib Naukluft Hiking Trail – considered one of the toughest in Southern Africa (eight-day/74 mile option or four-day/37 miles winding through the rugged Naukluft Mountains.

NWR offers something for everyone – whether it is photography, nature, wildlife, landscapes, geology, camping, fishing, birding, history, culture or just the pure exhilaration of finding yourself surrounded by the essence of Africa – NWR is your willing partner and host.


Corporate Social Responsibility

As a State Owned Enterprise, NWR places great value and emphasis on contributing to the sustainable economic growth of the country; and to contributing to sound environmental management practices and conservation efforts. The Enviro Kidz programme is an initiative by NWR aimed at providing opportunities to children from previously disadvantaged backgrounds, to experience the protected areas of Namibia, and in so doing create and nurture future generations of Namibians with a love and appreciation for their natural resources and environment.

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Executive Committee
First Row (Seated): Mufaro Nesongano – Corporate Communications Manager, Zelna Hengari – Managing Director
Second Row: Fransiska Nghitila – Environmental and Compliance Specialist, Martin Kantika – Acting IT Manager, Tangeni Kaulu – Acting Chief Operations Officer
Third Row: Zandry Haimbodi – Acting Chief RCIA Officer, Matthias Ngwangwama – Chief Financial Officer, Sebulon Chicalu – Chief Human Capital Officer, Epson Kasuto – Chief Marketing Officer.



 

 

Visionary, Accurate, Just in Time (JIT), Proactive
Committed, Knowledgeable, Dedicated, Respectful, Unique
Honest, Reliable, Consistent, Responsible, Sustainable
Caring, Efficient, Professional, Adaptable (flexible)
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NWR – Namibia Wildlife Resorts provides intimate park experiences through guided night drives in Etosha National Park; sunrise and sunset excursions to the majestic Sossusvlei; relaxing massages and wellness treatments using the healing properties of the natural hot springs mineral water at /Ai-/Ais – all in the company of the most passionate and professional staff.

NWR also offers real adventure activities such as hikes into Namibia's iconic landscapes on signature trails such as the Fish River Canyon - the world's second largest canyon (four to five days and approximately 50 miles) and the Namib Naukluft Hiking Trail – considered one of the toughest in Southern Africa (eight-day/74 mile option or four-day/37 miles winding through the rugged Naukluft Mountains. NWR offers something for everyone – whether it is photography, nature, wildlife, landscapes, geology, camping, fishing, birding, history, culture or just the pure exhilaration of finding yourself surrounded by the essence of Africa – NWR is your willing partner and host.


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Namibia, a country located in sub-Saharan Africa in the south western corner of the continent is a land of gripping beauty, wide open spaces and abundant sunshine. It is a country, arid for most parts but blessed with contrasting and unspoilt landscapes ranging from lush vegetation and riverine woodlands in the north eastern areas to mountains, gorges and spectacular desert settings in the southerly west.

With 22 National Parks, covering an area of more than 18% of the terrestrial area, Namibia has established an impressive System of National Parks, managed by the State, which constitutes a cornerstone of its hugely successful conservation programme.

While having recovered Elephant and Lion populations to complete the Big Five in Namibia, the country also boasts some exemplary conservation successes with the successful reintroduction of the Black Rhino in the Kunene communal areas and Etosha National Park and the reintroduction of Black Faced Impala. Namibia also boasts the highest population of free-ranging Cheetah in the whole world.

 

Namibia's Key Attractions

There are a number of natural attractions in Namibia. Here is a glimpse into just a few of them:

  1. Ai/-Ais/ Richterveldt Transfrontier Park: The area boasts the second largest canyon in the world, the Fish River Canyon - which opens every year.
  2. Namib Naukluft National Park: A protected area with large contrasts in vegetation and geology. Key places to see are Sossusvlei - the heart of the Namib Desert and where the highest sand dunes in the world can be found, the Sesriem Canyon and the Naukluft hiking trail - one of the toughest in the world.
  3. Skeleton Coast National Park: The Skeleton Coast is a desolate and vast area which shows the remnants of battles between man and nature over the centuries, as witnessed by a number of shipwrecks on the coast. Desert Elephant and antelope species wander the riverine landscapes of this vast area. The remoteness of the area and rich Atlantic coastline also lends itself suitable to fishing and angling. Make a booking with NWR for the best fishing experience in Namibia.

 

Currency

The national currency in Namibia is the Namibian Dollar which is linked to and equals in value the South African Rand. The South African Rand is accepted anywhere in Namibia on a one to one basis. The Namibian dollar has denominations of 200, 100, 50, 20 and 10 dollar notes, 5 and 1 dollar coins and 50, 10 and 5 cent coins.

Although the import of foreign currency into Namibia is unlimited, all foreign currency must be declared at the point of entry. Major credit cards are widely accepted throughout Namibia.

 

Getting Here

Main airlines coming in Namibia are Air Namibia and South African Airways, having daily connections in Hosea Kutako International Airport in the capital city Windhoek from Frankfurt, London and Johannesburg. In addition, there are daily connections from Cape Town and Johannesburg, and frequent connections from surrounding African countries.

For full information on the availability of flights to and from Namibia visit www.airnamibia.com.na

 

Getting Around

Internal or domestic flights are available from Windhoek (Hosea Kutako International Airport and Eros Airport) and Walvis Bay Airport. In addition there are small regional airports in Keetmanshoop, Katimo Mulilo, Rundu and Ondangwa.

Namibian roads are well maintained and car hire is readily available throughout the country. Coaches and busses run to and from the major cities within Namibia, Rail transport is also available with a luxury overnight coach from inland to the coast at a low speed.

 

Climate

Inland Namibia has hot summers with temperatures ranging up to 34 degrees Celsius and could experience frost in the winter months. Rainfall is expected mainly in the summer months. The main rain season is January to March, except in the south which experience winter rainfall.

The climate at the coast is mild ranging generally from 12 degrees Celsius to a pleasant 24 degrees throughout the year. Very hot east winds with sandstorms can at times be expected for short periods of usually two to three days in the winter months, in particular May to July. Average rainfall per year is limited to 50 mm along the coast to 350 mm in the central and 700 mm in the far north-eastern regions. Fog patches are mainly to be expected in the late winter and spring from August to November, which often clear during the day.

Namibia is the most arid country in Southern Africa, with humidity of about 10% in winter months and varying from 50% to 80% in summer.

 

History, Population, Language and Culture

Among the first people to inhabit Namibia were the San Bushmen. Later inhabitants include the Nama and the Damara. The Khoi-Khoi tribe came from the south, gradually displacing the San. The arrival of the Bantu-speaking Ovambo and Herero from the north marked the first tribal structures in Southern African Societies.

The first European visitors were Portuguese mariners seeking a way to the Indies in the late 15th century, but they confined their activities in Namibia to erecting stone crosses at certain points along the coast as navigational guides.

They were followed much later by the English and Germans. In 1878, the United Kingdom annexed Walvis Bay on behalf of Cape Colony, and the area was incorporated into the Cape of Good Hope in 1884. The annexation of the country by Germany in 1884 still accounts for the distinctive German architecture and traditions and the German influence is very much still evident in the country today.

In 1904, the Herero people, who were Bantu-speaking cattle herders, launched a rebellion, but it was brutally put down. Meanwhile, in the south, diamonds had been discovered east of Lüderitz by a South African labourer. The German authorities branded the entire area between Lüderitz and the Orange River a 'forbidden area'.

After Germany's defeat in the World War 1, the League of Nations entrusted the territory to South Africa, and the territory then became known as South West Africa. The mandate to rule was renewed by the United Nations following World War 2, but the UN refused to sanction the outright annexation of the country by South Africa. The South African government nevertheless tightened its grip on the country and imposed apartheid rule until well into the 1980s.

The South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) began it's armed struggle to liberate Namibia in 1966 and in 1971 the International Court of Justice upheld a UN decision, determining that South Africa's occupation of Namibia was illegal. In April 1978 the UN Plan called for the holding of elections in Namibia, under UN supervision and control. However, in November 1978, South Africa, in defiance of the UN, unilaterally held elections in Namibia which were boycotted by SWAPO and other political parties.

South Africa eventually was forced out by a combination of United Nations pressure and guerrilla warfare from SWAPO. The fall of apartheid and the release of Nelson Mandela from his 25 year incarceration, mirrored the international mood and reaction to the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the cold war with Glasnost.

In 1989, elections gave SWAPO a majority of seats in a constituent assembly. The new nation, called Namibia and led by the elected President Sam Nujoma, became independent on 21 March 1990 and Independence Day is annually celebrated on this date. On March 1, 1994, the coastal enclave of Walvis Bay and 12 offshore islands were transferred to Namibia by South Africa. This followed 3 years of negotiations between the governments of Namibia and South Africa and the peaceful resolution of this territorial dispute, which dated back to 1878, was praised by the international community.

Today Namibia is peaceful and economically is largely better off than many other countries of the region because of its productive mining, tourism, farming and fishing industries.

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